Movies

‘Night of the Templar’ – a review

Night of the TemplarWhat’s the absolute best thing about watching a movie that is known to be a veritable train-wreck? That it delivers!

Should I issue a spoiler alert? Perhaps, but the movie’s trailer is even more revealing.

Night of the Templar,” directed by Paul Sampson, was meant to capitalize on the never ceasing popularity of the Knights Templar while using a rather typical horror movie plot structure. Actual historic references are weak and obscure. The back story of the film involves a group of Templars who are trying to figure out what’s next for them after their Order had fallen out of favor. The choices made by these soldiers unexpectedly come into play when a motley crew of visitors arrives at a somewhat luxurious contemporary manor for a “fantasy weekend.” Their adventure quickly turns into a blood bath when someone wearing full Templar armor unleashes his wrath on the guests. Curiously enough, Agatha Christie could have made this plot work perfectly, but an opportunity for a decent whodunit is wasted in favor of an unimaginative metempsychosis explanation of what takes place on the grounds of the estate. Early on in the movie, it becomes evident that the man charged with organizing the “fantasy weekend” is none other than the reincarnated Templar commander featured in the back story. As a result, the plot suffers a terrible blow, because there is simply not a twist in existence that could  make us believe that this character is not responsible for the bloodshed. The viewer is simply forced to wait for the rest of the puzzle pieces to fall into place. The only surprise at the end comes in form of a completely misused principle of comic relief. In fact, if you end up liking the movie even in the slightest degree, the last ten minutes will take care of that.

One truly unexpected thing is that the movie could possibly contain some clues about the death of David Carradine (I will omit the details not meant for PG audiences). Does that make it worth watching? Probably not.

Knights Templar History and Myths: as seen in the movies

Now that I got Netflix, the plan is to become familiar with the various cinematic depictions of the Knights Templar Order. I am compiling my little list now. Surely, this list will be revisited, as more movies come to my attention.

Kingdom of Heaven
(already own this movie, of course)
Da Vinci Code. I have to include this one.
Code of the Templars (2004). A German flick, apparently not the best.
Arn – Tempelriddaren (Arn: The Knight Templar). A very decent TV series, recently released on DVD. At the time of this revision, ARN is available on NetFlix.
National Treasure. The connection to the Templars is rather marginal, but a pretty good movie.
Night of the Templar. Principal photography completed in December, 2007:
A Medieval Knight resurrects to fulfill his vow and bestow a blood-thirst vengeance upon the kindred spirits of those who betrayed him long ago. In the course of one night, identities will be revealed, destinies met, and a poetic justice of the macabre maniacally served.

Sounds like a nice romantic date movie, uh?

See also:
‘Night of the Templar’ – a review

A TV series about the Knights Templar

Seems as if this is being done for the Maltese television. They sure are trying to make the Templars look as if they were weird blood-drinking sorcerers. Can this interpretation be due to the still lingering rivalry between the Templars and the Knights of St. John (a.k.a Hospitallers)? :)

The fortified city of Mdina came under siege over the weekend as the Knights Templars engaged took on the Turks, under the scorching sun… and the cameras.

The football ground in Mdina doubled as the set for a scene from the last episode of the TV series Miriana Coljerò, which will air on One TV in the coming weeks.

About 40 extras in period costumes defended the old city, taking breaks from the “gruelling battle” that lasted several hours.

The TV series recounts how the Templars, whose privilege was that the first-born child inherited immortality, used to drink human blood as part of their ritual. The story continues that the Templars became evil people when they started killing innocent victims and drinking their blood to become more powerful, the scriptwriter and director of the series, Mark Doneo, explained.

http://www.timesofmalta.com/articles/vi … t-in-mdina

TV series based on Raymond Khoury’s “The Last Templar”

Apparently, for fear of being outdone by their Maltese counterparts, NBC decided to produce a miniseries with a Templar theme. It is to be based on Raymond Khoury’s novel “The Last Templar”.

Mira Sorvino is to star in this series as an archeologist searching for the Knights Templar. It seems as if I finally have to read this novel.

http://www.variety.com/article/VR111798 … 4&cs=1






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